Understanding our Present

Teaching Disputes Resolution Through On-line Role-play

Darryl Saunders, Alison Reedy

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Paper published in ProceedingsResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    The Disputes Resolution unit in the School of Law at Charles Darwin University demonstrates how new technologies can be used in higher education to design connected, innovative and interactive learning environments that stimulate the teaching of practical mediation skills. A pedagogic approach suited to online teaching is used in which online role-play scenarios are conducted using a variation of the online fishbowl approach. With this approach internal and external students take on character roles and interact in a synchronous online environment during a two-week intensive teaching block. The students jump in and out of their roles over the course of the two weeks as they research, role-play, interview and conduct peer reviews of the interactions. New technologies combined with innovative pedagogy enable the repositioning of external students as very much internal in the learning process and a new level of connection and interaction is possible between internal and external students.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the 30th Ascilite Conference
    EditorsH Carter, M Gosper, J Hedberg
    Place of PublicationSydney, Australia
    PublisherMacquarie University: E-Learning Centre of Excellence (MELCOE)
    Pages796-800
    Number of pages5
    ISBN (Print)978-1-74138-403-1
    Publication statusPublished - 2013
    EventAnnual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (ASCILITE 2013): Electric Dreams - Sydney, Sydney, Australia
    Duration: 1 Dec 20134 Dec 2013
    Conference number: 2013

    Conference

    ConferenceAnnual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (ASCILITE 2013)
    Abbreviated titleASCILITE
    CountryAustralia
    CitySydney
    Period1/12/134/12/13

    Fingerprint

    role play
    present
    Teaching
    block teaching
    new technology
    student
    peer review
    pedagogics
    interaction
    mediation
    learning process
    learning environment
    scenario
    Law
    interview
    school
    education

    Cite this

    Saunders, D., & Reedy, A. (2013). Understanding our Present: Teaching Disputes Resolution Through On-line Role-play. In H. Carter, M. Gosper, & J. Hedberg (Eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Ascilite Conference (pp. 796-800). Sydney, Australia: Macquarie University: E-Learning Centre of Excellence (MELCOE).
    Saunders, Darryl ; Reedy, Alison. / Understanding our Present : Teaching Disputes Resolution Through On-line Role-play. Proceedings of the 30th Ascilite Conference. editor / H Carter ; M Gosper ; J Hedberg. Sydney, Australia : Macquarie University: E-Learning Centre of Excellence (MELCOE), 2013. pp. 796-800
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    title = "Understanding our Present: Teaching Disputes Resolution Through On-line Role-play",
    abstract = "The Disputes Resolution unit in the School of Law at Charles Darwin University demonstrates how new technologies can be used in higher education to design connected, innovative and interactive learning environments that stimulate the teaching of practical mediation skills. A pedagogic approach suited to online teaching is used in which online role-play scenarios are conducted using a variation of the online fishbowl approach. With this approach internal and external students take on character roles and interact in a synchronous online environment during a two-week intensive teaching block. The students jump in and out of their roles over the course of the two weeks as they research, role-play, interview and conduct peer reviews of the interactions. New technologies combined with innovative pedagogy enable the repositioning of external students as very much internal in the learning process and a new level of connection and interaction is possible between internal and external students.",
    author = "Darryl Saunders and Alison Reedy",
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    Saunders, D & Reedy, A 2013, Understanding our Present: Teaching Disputes Resolution Through On-line Role-play. in H Carter, M Gosper & J Hedberg (eds), Proceedings of the 30th Ascilite Conference. Macquarie University: E-Learning Centre of Excellence (MELCOE), Sydney, Australia, pp. 796-800, Annual Conference of the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education (ASCILITE 2013), Sydney, Australia, 1/12/13.

    Understanding our Present : Teaching Disputes Resolution Through On-line Role-play. / Saunders, Darryl; Reedy, Alison.

    Proceedings of the 30th Ascilite Conference. ed. / H Carter; M Gosper; J Hedberg. Sydney, Australia : Macquarie University: E-Learning Centre of Excellence (MELCOE), 2013. p. 796-800.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Paper published in ProceedingsResearchpeer-review

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    Saunders D, Reedy A. Understanding our Present: Teaching Disputes Resolution Through On-line Role-play. In Carter H, Gosper M, Hedberg J, editors, Proceedings of the 30th Ascilite Conference. Sydney, Australia: Macquarie University: E-Learning Centre of Excellence (MELCOE). 2013. p. 796-800