Understanding Public Support for Indigenous Natural Resource Management in Northern Australia

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    Abstract

    Increased interest in indigenous-led natural resource management (NRM) on traditionally owned land in northern Australia has raised important questions in relation to policies that compensate indigenous Australians for providing environmental services. A choice experiment survey was mailed out to respondents across the whole of Australia to assess if and to what extent Australian people think that society benefits from these services and how much they would pay for them. More than half the respondents would in principle support indigenous NRM in northern Australia, with a high willingness to pay for carbon, biodiversity, and recreational services. Social aspects of indigenous NRM, however, were not valued by the society, emphasizing the need for awareness raising and clarifications of benefits that indigenous people gain while carrying out land management on their traditional country. Any marketing campaign should take into account preference variation across Australian society, which this research shows is substantial, particularly between people from the north and those from the south. People from the south were more likely to support indigenous NRM, a significant finding for campaigns targeting potential donors. � 2013 by the author(s).
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-14
    Number of pages14
    JournalEcology and Society
    Volume18
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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    resource management
    natural resource
    willingness to pay
    land management
    targeting
    marketing
    biodiversity
    public
    carbon
    society
    services
    experiment

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    title = "Understanding Public Support for Indigenous Natural Resource Management in Northern Australia",
    abstract = "Increased interest in indigenous-led natural resource management (NRM) on traditionally owned land in northern Australia has raised important questions in relation to policies that compensate indigenous Australians for providing environmental services. A choice experiment survey was mailed out to respondents across the whole of Australia to assess if and to what extent Australian people think that society benefits from these services and how much they would pay for them. More than half the respondents would in principle support indigenous NRM in northern Australia, with a high willingness to pay for carbon, biodiversity, and recreational services. Social aspects of indigenous NRM, however, were not valued by the society, emphasizing the need for awareness raising and clarifications of benefits that indigenous people gain while carrying out land management on their traditional country. Any marketing campaign should take into account preference variation across Australian society, which this research shows is substantial, particularly between people from the north and those from the south. People from the south were more likely to support indigenous NRM, a significant finding for campaigns targeting potential donors. � 2013 by the author(s).",
    keywords = "biodiversity, conservation management, indigenous population, land management, marketing, natural resource, recreational development, resource management, willingness to pay, Australia",
    author = "Kerstin Zander",
    year = "2013",
    doi = "10.5751/ES-05267-180111",
    language = "English",
    volume = "18",
    pages = "1--14",
    journal = "Ecology and Society",
    issn = "1195-5449",
    publisher = "Resilience Alliance Publications",
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    }

    Understanding Public Support for Indigenous Natural Resource Management in Northern Australia. / Zander, Kerstin.

    In: Ecology and Society, Vol. 18, No. 1, 2013, p. 1-14.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Understanding Public Support for Indigenous Natural Resource Management in Northern Australia

    AU - Zander, Kerstin

    PY - 2013

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    N2 - Increased interest in indigenous-led natural resource management (NRM) on traditionally owned land in northern Australia has raised important questions in relation to policies that compensate indigenous Australians for providing environmental services. A choice experiment survey was mailed out to respondents across the whole of Australia to assess if and to what extent Australian people think that society benefits from these services and how much they would pay for them. More than half the respondents would in principle support indigenous NRM in northern Australia, with a high willingness to pay for carbon, biodiversity, and recreational services. Social aspects of indigenous NRM, however, were not valued by the society, emphasizing the need for awareness raising and clarifications of benefits that indigenous people gain while carrying out land management on their traditional country. Any marketing campaign should take into account preference variation across Australian society, which this research shows is substantial, particularly between people from the north and those from the south. People from the south were more likely to support indigenous NRM, a significant finding for campaigns targeting potential donors. � 2013 by the author(s).

    AB - Increased interest in indigenous-led natural resource management (NRM) on traditionally owned land in northern Australia has raised important questions in relation to policies that compensate indigenous Australians for providing environmental services. A choice experiment survey was mailed out to respondents across the whole of Australia to assess if and to what extent Australian people think that society benefits from these services and how much they would pay for them. More than half the respondents would in principle support indigenous NRM in northern Australia, with a high willingness to pay for carbon, biodiversity, and recreational services. Social aspects of indigenous NRM, however, were not valued by the society, emphasizing the need for awareness raising and clarifications of benefits that indigenous people gain while carrying out land management on their traditional country. Any marketing campaign should take into account preference variation across Australian society, which this research shows is substantial, particularly between people from the north and those from the south. People from the south were more likely to support indigenous NRM, a significant finding for campaigns targeting potential donors. � 2013 by the author(s).

    KW - biodiversity

    KW - conservation management

    KW - indigenous population

    KW - land management

    KW - marketing

    KW - natural resource

    KW - recreational development

    KW - resource management

    KW - willingness to pay

    KW - Australia

    U2 - 10.5751/ES-05267-180111

    DO - 10.5751/ES-05267-180111

    M3 - Article

    VL - 18

    SP - 1

    EP - 14

    JO - Ecology and Society

    JF - Ecology and Society

    SN - 1195-5449

    IS - 1

    ER -