Upper Respiratory Microbiota in Relation to Ear and Nose Health Among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children

Andrea Coleman, Seweryn Bialasiewicz, Robyn Marsh, Eva Grahn Håkansson, Kyra Cottrell, Amanda Wood, Nadeesha Jayasundara, Robert S. Ware, Julian Zaugg, Hanna E Sidjabat, Jasmyn Adams, Josephine Ferguson, Matthew Brown, Kristian Roos, Anders Cervin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Background: We explored the nasal microbiota in Indigenous Australian children in relation to ear and nasal health.

    Methods: In total, 103 Indigenous Australian children aged 2–7 years (mean 4.7 years) were recruited from 2 Queensland communities. Children’s ears, nose, and throats were examined and upper respiratory tract (URT) swabs collected. Clinical histories were obtained from parents/medical records. URT microbiota were characterized using culturomics with Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) identification. Real-time PCR was used to quantify otopathogen (Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis) loads and detect respiratory viruses. Data were analyzed using beta diversity measures, regression modeling, and a correlation network analysis.

    Results: Children with historical/current otitis media (OM) or URT infection (URTI) had higher nasal otopathogen detection and loads and rhinovirus detection compared with healthy children (all P < .04). Children with purulent rhinorrhea had higher nasal otopathogen detection and loads and rhinovirus detection (P < .04) compared with healthy children. High otopathogen loads were correlated in children with historical/current OM or URTI, whereas Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum and Dolosigranulum pigrum were correlated in healthy children.

    Conclusions: Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum and D. pigrum are associated with URT and ear health. The importance of the main otopathogens in URT disease/OM was confirmed, and their role relates to co-colonization and high otopathogens loads.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numberpiaa141
    Pages (from-to)1-9
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society
    DOIs
    Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 4 Jan 2021

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Upper Respiratory Microbiota in Relation to Ear and Nose Health Among Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this