Upper respiratory tract bacterial carriage in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in a semi-arid area of Western Australia

K Watson, K Carville, J Bowman, Peter Jacoby, T Riley, Amanda Leach, Deborah Lehmann, Kalgoorlie Otitis Media Research Project Team

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis are associated with otitis media (OM). Indigenous children experience particularly high rates of OM. Few studies worldwide have described upper respiratory tract (URT) carriage in Indigenous and non-Indigenous children living in the same area. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe URT bacterial carriage in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in the Kalgoorlie-Boulder area, Western Australia, as part of an investigation into causal pathways to OM. METHODS: Five hundred four and 1045 nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 100 Aboriginal and 180 non-Aboriginal children, respectively, followed from birth to age 2 years. Standard procedures were used to identify bacteria. RESULTS: Overall carriage rates of S. pneumoniae, M. catarrhalis and H. influenzae in Aboriginal children were 49%, 50% and 41%, respectively, and 25%, 25% and 11% in non-Aboriginal children. By age 2 months S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis had been isolated from 37% and 36% of Aboriginal children and from 11% and 12% of non-Aboriginal children, respectively. From age 3 months onward, carriage rates in Aboriginal children were 51% to 67% for S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis and 42% to 62% for H. influenzae; corresponding figures for non-Aboriginal children were 26% to 37% for S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis and 11% to 18% for H. influenzae. Non-Aboriginal children had higher carriage rates in winter than in summer, but season had little effect in Aboriginal children. Staphylococcus aureus carriage was highest under age 1 month (55% Aboriginal, 61% non-Aboriginal) and was always higher in non-Aboriginal than Aboriginal children. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions are needed to reduce high transmission and carriage rates, particularly in Aboriginal communities, to avoid the serious consequences of OM. Copyright � 2006 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)782-790
Number of pages9
JournalPediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Volume25
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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Western Australia
Respiratory System
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Haemophilus influenzae
Otitis Media
Staphylococcus aureus

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Watson, K., Carville, K., Bowman, J., Jacoby, P., Riley, T., Leach, A., ... Kalgoorlie Otitis Media Research Project Team (2006). Upper respiratory tract bacterial carriage in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in a semi-arid area of Western Australia. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 25(9), 782-790.
Watson, K ; Carville, K ; Bowman, J ; Jacoby, Peter ; Riley, T ; Leach, Amanda ; Lehmann, Deborah ; Kalgoorlie Otitis Media Research Project Team. / Upper respiratory tract bacterial carriage in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in a semi-arid area of Western Australia. In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal. 2006 ; Vol. 25, No. 9. pp. 782-790.
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title = "Upper respiratory tract bacterial carriage in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in a semi-arid area of Western Australia",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis are associated with otitis media (OM). Indigenous children experience particularly high rates of OM. Few studies worldwide have described upper respiratory tract (URT) carriage in Indigenous and non-Indigenous children living in the same area. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe URT bacterial carriage in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in the Kalgoorlie-Boulder area, Western Australia, as part of an investigation into causal pathways to OM. METHODS: Five hundred four and 1045 nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 100 Aboriginal and 180 non-Aboriginal children, respectively, followed from birth to age 2 years. Standard procedures were used to identify bacteria. RESULTS: Overall carriage rates of S. pneumoniae, M. catarrhalis and H. influenzae in Aboriginal children were 49{\%}, 50{\%} and 41{\%}, respectively, and 25{\%}, 25{\%} and 11{\%} in non-Aboriginal children. By age 2 months S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis had been isolated from 37{\%} and 36{\%} of Aboriginal children and from 11{\%} and 12{\%} of non-Aboriginal children, respectively. From age 3 months onward, carriage rates in Aboriginal children were 51{\%} to 67{\%} for S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis and 42{\%} to 62{\%} for H. influenzae; corresponding figures for non-Aboriginal children were 26{\%} to 37{\%} for S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis and 11{\%} to 18{\%} for H. influenzae. Non-Aboriginal children had higher carriage rates in winter than in summer, but season had little effect in Aboriginal children. Staphylococcus aureus carriage was highest under age 1 month (55{\%} Aboriginal, 61{\%} non-Aboriginal) and was always higher in non-Aboriginal than Aboriginal children. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions are needed to reduce high transmission and carriage rates, particularly in Aboriginal communities, to avoid the serious consequences of OM. Copyright � 2006 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.",
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Watson, K, Carville, K, Bowman, J, Jacoby, P, Riley, T, Leach, A, Lehmann, D & Kalgoorlie Otitis Media Research Project Team 2006, 'Upper respiratory tract bacterial carriage in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in a semi-arid area of Western Australia', Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 25, no. 9, pp. 782-790.

Upper respiratory tract bacterial carriage in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in a semi-arid area of Western Australia. / Watson, K; Carville, K; Bowman, J; Jacoby, Peter; Riley, T; Leach, Amanda; Lehmann, Deborah; Kalgoorlie Otitis Media Research Project Team.

In: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, Vol. 25, No. 9, 2006, p. 782-790.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Upper respiratory tract bacterial carriage in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in a semi-arid area of Western Australia

AU - Watson, K

AU - Carville, K

AU - Bowman, J

AU - Jacoby, Peter

AU - Riley, T

AU - Leach, Amanda

AU - Lehmann, Deborah

AU - Kalgoorlie Otitis Media Research Project Team, null

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis are associated with otitis media (OM). Indigenous children experience particularly high rates of OM. Few studies worldwide have described upper respiratory tract (URT) carriage in Indigenous and non-Indigenous children living in the same area. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe URT bacterial carriage in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in the Kalgoorlie-Boulder area, Western Australia, as part of an investigation into causal pathways to OM. METHODS: Five hundred four and 1045 nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 100 Aboriginal and 180 non-Aboriginal children, respectively, followed from birth to age 2 years. Standard procedures were used to identify bacteria. RESULTS: Overall carriage rates of S. pneumoniae, M. catarrhalis and H. influenzae in Aboriginal children were 49%, 50% and 41%, respectively, and 25%, 25% and 11% in non-Aboriginal children. By age 2 months S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis had been isolated from 37% and 36% of Aboriginal children and from 11% and 12% of non-Aboriginal children, respectively. From age 3 months onward, carriage rates in Aboriginal children were 51% to 67% for S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis and 42% to 62% for H. influenzae; corresponding figures for non-Aboriginal children were 26% to 37% for S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis and 11% to 18% for H. influenzae. Non-Aboriginal children had higher carriage rates in winter than in summer, but season had little effect in Aboriginal children. Staphylococcus aureus carriage was highest under age 1 month (55% Aboriginal, 61% non-Aboriginal) and was always higher in non-Aboriginal than Aboriginal children. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions are needed to reduce high transmission and carriage rates, particularly in Aboriginal communities, to avoid the serious consequences of OM. Copyright � 2006 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

AB - BACKGROUND: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis are associated with otitis media (OM). Indigenous children experience particularly high rates of OM. Few studies worldwide have described upper respiratory tract (URT) carriage in Indigenous and non-Indigenous children living in the same area. AIM: The aim of this study was to describe URT bacterial carriage in Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal children in the Kalgoorlie-Boulder area, Western Australia, as part of an investigation into causal pathways to OM. METHODS: Five hundred four and 1045 nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected from 100 Aboriginal and 180 non-Aboriginal children, respectively, followed from birth to age 2 years. Standard procedures were used to identify bacteria. RESULTS: Overall carriage rates of S. pneumoniae, M. catarrhalis and H. influenzae in Aboriginal children were 49%, 50% and 41%, respectively, and 25%, 25% and 11% in non-Aboriginal children. By age 2 months S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis had been isolated from 37% and 36% of Aboriginal children and from 11% and 12% of non-Aboriginal children, respectively. From age 3 months onward, carriage rates in Aboriginal children were 51% to 67% for S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis and 42% to 62% for H. influenzae; corresponding figures for non-Aboriginal children were 26% to 37% for S. pneumoniae and M. catarrhalis and 11% to 18% for H. influenzae. Non-Aboriginal children had higher carriage rates in winter than in summer, but season had little effect in Aboriginal children. Staphylococcus aureus carriage was highest under age 1 month (55% Aboriginal, 61% non-Aboriginal) and was always higher in non-Aboriginal than Aboriginal children. CONCLUSIONS: Interventions are needed to reduce high transmission and carriage rates, particularly in Aboriginal communities, to avoid the serious consequences of OM. Copyright � 2006 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

KW - Aborigine

KW - article

KW - aspiration

KW - Australia

KW - bacterium isolate

KW - child

KW - community

KW - disease carrier

KW - disease transmission

KW - female

KW - Haemophilus influenzae

KW - heterozygote detection

KW - human

KW - infant

KW - major clinical study

KW - male

KW - Moraxella catarrhalis

KW - nasopharynx

KW - otitis media

KW - pharynx examination

KW - priority journal

KW - season

KW - Staphylococcus aureus

KW - Streptococcus pneumonia

KW - summer

KW - throat culture

KW - winter

KW - Child, Preschool

KW - Desert Climate

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Infant

KW - Infant, Newborn

KW - Male

KW - Meningococcal Vaccines

KW - Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis

KW - Nasopharynx

KW - Oceanic Ancestry Group

KW - Otitis Media

KW - Pneumococcal Vaccines

KW - Respiratory Tract Infections

KW - Sex Factors

KW - Streptococcus pneumoniae

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 782

EP - 790

JO - Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

JF - Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal

SN - 0891-3668

IS - 9

ER -