Using an acoustic telemetry array to assess fish volumetric space use

A case study on impoundments, hypoxia and an air-breathing species (Neoceratodus forsteri)

D. T. Roberts, V. Udyawer, C. Franklin, R. G. Dwyer, H. A. Campbell

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Facultative air-breathing fish can persist in hypoxic waters due to their capacity to acquire atmospheric oxygen. Most studies examining responses of air-breathing fish to aquatic hypoxia have occurred under experimental conditions. How air-breathing fish respond to hypoxic conditions in the field has received less attention. Using depth sensor transmitters and an array of acoustic receivers to monitor the facultative air-breathing Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri), we investigated habitat preferences and behavioural responses to seasonal hypoxic zones in a riverine impoundment. Three-dimensional (3-D) kernel utilisation distribution (KUD) models revealed that during stratified conditions, lungfish remained above the oxycline, rarely venturing into hypoxic waters, whereas during holomixis lungfish used a wider range of depths. Total volumetric space utilisation did not change significantly during stratified periods, but the distribution of space used changed, constrained by the oxycline. Despite N. forsteri having lungs to supplement oxygen requirements, the presence of a hypoxic zone constrained the core (50% 3-D-KUD) volumetric space used by lungfish to <1.6% of the total available space of the study area. With increasing demand for new impoundments in many tropical and subtropical regions, the present study provides insights to how air-breathing fish species may respond to altered riverine conditions from impoundments.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1532-1543
    Number of pages12
    JournalMarine and Freshwater Research
    Volume68
    Issue number8
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 9 Feb 2017

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    Telemetry
    space use
    hypoxia
    impoundment
    telemetry
    Acoustics
    breathing
    acoustics
    Respiration
    Fishes
    Air
    case studies
    air
    fish
    oxygen requirement
    Oxygen
    oxygen
    Water
    subtropical region
    behavioral response

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Facultative air-breathing fish can persist in hypoxic waters due to their capacity to acquire atmospheric oxygen. Most studies examining responses of air-breathing fish to aquatic hypoxia have occurred under experimental conditions. How air-breathing fish respond to hypoxic conditions in the field has received less attention. Using depth sensor transmitters and an array of acoustic receivers to monitor the facultative air-breathing Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri), we investigated habitat preferences and behavioural responses to seasonal hypoxic zones in a riverine impoundment. Three-dimensional (3-D) kernel utilisation distribution (KUD) models revealed that during stratified conditions, lungfish remained above the oxycline, rarely venturing into hypoxic waters, whereas during holomixis lungfish used a wider range of depths. Total volumetric space utilisation did not change significantly during stratified periods, but the distribution of space used changed, constrained by the oxycline. Despite N. forsteri having lungs to supplement oxygen requirements, the presence of a hypoxic zone constrained the core (50{\%} 3-D-KUD) volumetric space used by lungfish to <1.6{\%} of the total available space of the study area. With increasing demand for new impoundments in many tropical and subtropical regions, the present study provides insights to how air-breathing fish species may respond to altered riverine conditions from impoundments.",
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    Using an acoustic telemetry array to assess fish volumetric space use : A case study on impoundments, hypoxia and an air-breathing species (Neoceratodus forsteri). / Roberts, D. T.; Udyawer, V.; Franklin, C.; Dwyer, R. G.; Campbell, H. A.

    In: Marine and Freshwater Research, Vol. 68, No. 8, 09.02.2017, p. 1532-1543.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    T2 - A case study on impoundments, hypoxia and an air-breathing species (Neoceratodus forsteri)

    AU - Roberts, D. T.

    AU - Udyawer, V.

    AU - Franklin, C.

    AU - Dwyer, R. G.

    AU - Campbell, H. A.

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    N2 - Facultative air-breathing fish can persist in hypoxic waters due to their capacity to acquire atmospheric oxygen. Most studies examining responses of air-breathing fish to aquatic hypoxia have occurred under experimental conditions. How air-breathing fish respond to hypoxic conditions in the field has received less attention. Using depth sensor transmitters and an array of acoustic receivers to monitor the facultative air-breathing Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri), we investigated habitat preferences and behavioural responses to seasonal hypoxic zones in a riverine impoundment. Three-dimensional (3-D) kernel utilisation distribution (KUD) models revealed that during stratified conditions, lungfish remained above the oxycline, rarely venturing into hypoxic waters, whereas during holomixis lungfish used a wider range of depths. Total volumetric space utilisation did not change significantly during stratified periods, but the distribution of space used changed, constrained by the oxycline. Despite N. forsteri having lungs to supplement oxygen requirements, the presence of a hypoxic zone constrained the core (50% 3-D-KUD) volumetric space used by lungfish to <1.6% of the total available space of the study area. With increasing demand for new impoundments in many tropical and subtropical regions, the present study provides insights to how air-breathing fish species may respond to altered riverine conditions from impoundments.

    AB - Facultative air-breathing fish can persist in hypoxic waters due to their capacity to acquire atmospheric oxygen. Most studies examining responses of air-breathing fish to aquatic hypoxia have occurred under experimental conditions. How air-breathing fish respond to hypoxic conditions in the field has received less attention. Using depth sensor transmitters and an array of acoustic receivers to monitor the facultative air-breathing Australian lungfish (Neoceratodus forsteri), we investigated habitat preferences and behavioural responses to seasonal hypoxic zones in a riverine impoundment. Three-dimensional (3-D) kernel utilisation distribution (KUD) models revealed that during stratified conditions, lungfish remained above the oxycline, rarely venturing into hypoxic waters, whereas during holomixis lungfish used a wider range of depths. Total volumetric space utilisation did not change significantly during stratified periods, but the distribution of space used changed, constrained by the oxycline. Despite N. forsteri having lungs to supplement oxygen requirements, the presence of a hypoxic zone constrained the core (50% 3-D-KUD) volumetric space used by lungfish to <1.6% of the total available space of the study area. With increasing demand for new impoundments in many tropical and subtropical regions, the present study provides insights to how air-breathing fish species may respond to altered riverine conditions from impoundments.

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    KW - kernel utilisation distribution

    KW - lungfish

    KW - stratification

    KW - Vemco positioning system.

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