Using G6PD tests to enable the safe treatment of Plasmodium vivax infections with primaquine on the Thailand-Myanmar border: A cost-effectiveness analysis

Angela Devine, Minnie Parmiter, Cindy S. Chu, Germana Bancone, Francois Nosten, Ric Price, Yoel Lubell, Shunmay Yeung

    Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

    Abstract

    Primaquine is the only licensed antimalarial for the radical cure ofPlasmodium vivax infections. Many countries, however, do not administer primaquine due to fear of hemolysis in those with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency. In other settings, primaquine is given without G6PD testing, putting patients at risk of hemolysis. New rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) offer the opportunity to screen for G6PD deficiency prior to treatment with primaquine. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of using G6PD RDTs on the Thailand-Myanmar border and developed an online model to examine the validity of these findings in other settings. Decision tree models for the management of P. vivax malaria evaluated the costs and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) associated with recurrences and primaquine-induced hemolysis from a health care provider perspective. Screening with G6PD RDTs before primaquine use was compared to (1) giving chloroquine alone and (2) giving primaquine without screening. Data were taken from a recent study on the impact of primaquine on P. vivax recurrences and a literature review. Compared to the use of chloroquine alone, the screening strategy had similar costswhile averting 0.026 and 0.024 DALYs per primary infection in malesand females respectively. Compared to primaquine administered without screening, the screening strategy provided modest cost savings while averting 0.011 and 0.004 DALYs in males and females respectively. The probabilistic sensitivity analyses resulted in a greater than 75% certainty that the screening strategy was cost-effective at a willingness to pay threshold of US$500, which is well below the common benchmark of per capita gross domestic product for Myanmar. In this setting G6PD RDTs could avert DALYs by reducing recurrences and reducing hemolytic risk in G6PD deficient patients at low costs or cost savings.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number659
    Pages (from-to)206-206
    Number of pages1
    JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
    Volume97
    Issue numberSuppl. 5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2017

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