Using long-term water balances to parameterize surface conductances and calculate evaporation at 0.05°spatial resolution

Yongqiang Zhang, Ray Leuning, Lindsay B. Hutley, Jason Beringer, Ian McHugh, Jeffrey P. Walker

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Evaporation from the land surface, averaged over successive 8 day intervals and at 0.05° (∼5 km) spatial resolution, was calculated using the Penman-Monteith (PM) energy balance equation, gridded meteorology, and a simple biophysical model for surface conductance. This conductance is a function of evaporation from the soil surface, leaf area index, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation, atmospheric water vapor pressure deficit, and maximum stomatal conductance (gsx). The novelty of this paper is the use of a "Budyko-curve" hydrometeorological model to estimate mean annual evaporation rates and hence a unique value of gsx for each grid cell across the Australian continent. First, the hydrometeorological model was calibrated using long-term water balances from 285 gauged catchments. Second, gridded meteorological data were used with the calibrated hydrometeorological model to estimate mean annual average evaporation (Ē) for each grid cell. Third, the value of gsx for each cell was adjusted to equate Ē calculated using the PM equation with Ē from the hydrometeorological model. This closes the annual water balance but allows the PM equation to provide a finer temporal resolution for evaporation than is possible with an annual water balance model. There was satisfactory agreement (0.49 < R 2 < 0.80) between 8 day average evaporation rates obtained using remotely sensed leaf area indices, the parameterized PM equation, and observations of actual evaporation at four Australian eddy covariance flux sites for the period 2000-2008. The evaporation product can be used for hydrological model calibration to improve runoff prediction studies in ungauged catchments. Copyright © 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-14
    Number of pages14
    JournalWater Resources Research
    Volume46
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2010

    Fingerprint

    water budget
    evaporation
    Penman-Monteith equation
    leaf area index
    catchment
    eddy covariance
    photosynthetically active radiation
    stomatal conductance
    vapor pressure
    meteorology
    energy balance
    land surface
    water vapor
    soil surface
    spatial resolution
    runoff
    calibration
    prediction

    Cite this

    Zhang, Yongqiang ; Leuning, Ray ; Hutley, Lindsay B. ; Beringer, Jason ; McHugh, Ian ; Walker, Jeffrey P. / Using long-term water balances to parameterize surface conductances and calculate evaporation at 0.05°spatial resolution. In: Water Resources Research. 2010 ; Vol. 46, No. 5. pp. 1-14.
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    abstract = "Evaporation from the land surface, averaged over successive 8 day intervals and at 0.05° (∼5 km) spatial resolution, was calculated using the Penman-Monteith (PM) energy balance equation, gridded meteorology, and a simple biophysical model for surface conductance. This conductance is a function of evaporation from the soil surface, leaf area index, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation, atmospheric water vapor pressure deficit, and maximum stomatal conductance (gsx). The novelty of this paper is the use of a {"}Budyko-curve{"} hydrometeorological model to estimate mean annual evaporation rates and hence a unique value of gsx for each grid cell across the Australian continent. First, the hydrometeorological model was calibrated using long-term water balances from 285 gauged catchments. Second, gridded meteorological data were used with the calibrated hydrometeorological model to estimate mean annual average evaporation (Ē) for each grid cell. Third, the value of gsx for each cell was adjusted to equate Ē calculated using the PM equation with Ē from the hydrometeorological model. This closes the annual water balance but allows the PM equation to provide a finer temporal resolution for evaporation than is possible with an annual water balance model. There was satisfactory agreement (0.49 < R 2 < 0.80) between 8 day average evaporation rates obtained using remotely sensed leaf area indices, the parameterized PM equation, and observations of actual evaporation at four Australian eddy covariance flux sites for the period 2000-2008. The evaporation product can be used for hydrological model calibration to improve runoff prediction studies in ungauged catchments. Copyright {\circledC} 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.",
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    author = "Yongqiang Zhang and Ray Leuning and Hutley, {Lindsay B.} and Jason Beringer and Ian McHugh and Walker, {Jeffrey P.}",
    year = "2010",
    month = "5",
    doi = "10.1029/2009WR008716",
    language = "English",
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    Using long-term water balances to parameterize surface conductances and calculate evaporation at 0.05°spatial resolution. / Zhang, Yongqiang; Leuning, Ray; Hutley, Lindsay B.; Beringer, Jason; McHugh, Ian; Walker, Jeffrey P.

    In: Water Resources Research, Vol. 46, No. 5, 05.2010, p. 1-14.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Using long-term water balances to parameterize surface conductances and calculate evaporation at 0.05°spatial resolution

    AU - Zhang, Yongqiang

    AU - Leuning, Ray

    AU - Hutley, Lindsay B.

    AU - Beringer, Jason

    AU - McHugh, Ian

    AU - Walker, Jeffrey P.

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    N2 - Evaporation from the land surface, averaged over successive 8 day intervals and at 0.05° (∼5 km) spatial resolution, was calculated using the Penman-Monteith (PM) energy balance equation, gridded meteorology, and a simple biophysical model for surface conductance. This conductance is a function of evaporation from the soil surface, leaf area index, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation, atmospheric water vapor pressure deficit, and maximum stomatal conductance (gsx). The novelty of this paper is the use of a "Budyko-curve" hydrometeorological model to estimate mean annual evaporation rates and hence a unique value of gsx for each grid cell across the Australian continent. First, the hydrometeorological model was calibrated using long-term water balances from 285 gauged catchments. Second, gridded meteorological data were used with the calibrated hydrometeorological model to estimate mean annual average evaporation (Ē) for each grid cell. Third, the value of gsx for each cell was adjusted to equate Ē calculated using the PM equation with Ē from the hydrometeorological model. This closes the annual water balance but allows the PM equation to provide a finer temporal resolution for evaporation than is possible with an annual water balance model. There was satisfactory agreement (0.49 < R 2 < 0.80) between 8 day average evaporation rates obtained using remotely sensed leaf area indices, the parameterized PM equation, and observations of actual evaporation at four Australian eddy covariance flux sites for the period 2000-2008. The evaporation product can be used for hydrological model calibration to improve runoff prediction studies in ungauged catchments. Copyright © 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

    AB - Evaporation from the land surface, averaged over successive 8 day intervals and at 0.05° (∼5 km) spatial resolution, was calculated using the Penman-Monteith (PM) energy balance equation, gridded meteorology, and a simple biophysical model for surface conductance. This conductance is a function of evaporation from the soil surface, leaf area index, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation, atmospheric water vapor pressure deficit, and maximum stomatal conductance (gsx). The novelty of this paper is the use of a "Budyko-curve" hydrometeorological model to estimate mean annual evaporation rates and hence a unique value of gsx for each grid cell across the Australian continent. First, the hydrometeorological model was calibrated using long-term water balances from 285 gauged catchments. Second, gridded meteorological data were used with the calibrated hydrometeorological model to estimate mean annual average evaporation (Ē) for each grid cell. Third, the value of gsx for each cell was adjusted to equate Ē calculated using the PM equation with Ē from the hydrometeorological model. This closes the annual water balance but allows the PM equation to provide a finer temporal resolution for evaporation than is possible with an annual water balance model. There was satisfactory agreement (0.49 < R 2 < 0.80) between 8 day average evaporation rates obtained using remotely sensed leaf area indices, the parameterized PM equation, and observations of actual evaporation at four Australian eddy covariance flux sites for the period 2000-2008. The evaporation product can be used for hydrological model calibration to improve runoff prediction studies in ungauged catchments. Copyright © 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

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    KW - Atmospheric water vapor

    KW - Biophysical model

    KW - Eddy covariance

    KW - Energy balance equations

    KW - Evaporation products

    KW - Evaporation rate

    KW - Grid cells

    KW - Hydrological models

    KW - Land surface

    KW - Leaf Area Index

    KW - Meteorological data

    KW - Parameterized

    KW - Penman-Monteith

    KW - Photosynthetically active radiation

    KW - Runoff prediction

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    KW - Evaporation

    KW - Forestry

    KW - Image resolution

    KW - Plants (botany)

    KW - Remote sensing

    KW - Runoff

    KW - Water vapor

    KW - Climatology

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    KW - hydraulic conductivity

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    KW - hydrometeorology

    KW - leaf area index

    KW - numerical model

    KW - parameterization

    KW - Penman-Monteith equation

    KW - photosynthetically active radiation

    KW - remote sensing

    KW - runoff

    KW - soil surface

    KW - spatial resolution

    KW - stomatal conductance

    KW - water budget

    KW - water vapor

    KW - Australia

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    U2 - 10.1029/2009WR008716

    DO - 10.1029/2009WR008716

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    JO - Water Resources Research

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