Vaccines for children and adults with chronic lung disease

Efficacy against acute exacerbations

Kerry-Ann O'Grady, Anne Chang, Keith Grimwood

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Acute exacerbations of chronic lung disease are usually associated with viral and bacterial pathogens. They contribute to declining lung function, poor quality of life and exert an excess burden on individuals, families, communities and the healthcare sector. Hence, preventing exacerbations is important in clinical management. Several vaccines providing protection against respiratory pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Bordetella pertussis and influenza) that can trigger exacerbations are available, but evidence to support their effectiveness in preventing exacerbations of chronic lung disease is limited. Candidate vaccines in pre-clinical or clinical development phases include those targeting Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinoviruses. However, it is likely to be several years before vaccines against these pathogens are available for children and adults with chronic lung diseases. For vaccination to play an important role in managing chronic lung disease efforts need to be directed at understanding how various pathogens cause exacerbations and alter long-term lung function.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)43-55
    Number of pages13
    JournalExpert Review of Respiratory Medicine
    Volume8
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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    Lung Diseases
    Chronic Disease
    Vaccines
    Human respiratory syncytial virus
    Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis
    Rhinovirus
    Community Health Services
    Bordetella pertussis
    Lung
    Health Care Sector
    Haemophilus influenzae
    Streptococcus pneumoniae
    Pseudomonas aeruginosa
    Human Influenza
    Staphylococcus aureus
    Vaccination
    Quality of Life

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Acute exacerbations of chronic lung disease are usually associated with viral and bacterial pathogens. They contribute to declining lung function, poor quality of life and exert an excess burden on individuals, families, communities and the healthcare sector. Hence, preventing exacerbations is important in clinical management. Several vaccines providing protection against respiratory pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Bordetella pertussis and influenza) that can trigger exacerbations are available, but evidence to support their effectiveness in preventing exacerbations of chronic lung disease is limited. Candidate vaccines in pre-clinical or clinical development phases include those targeting Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respiratory syncytial virus and human rhinoviruses. However, it is likely to be several years before vaccines against these pathogens are available for children and adults with chronic lung diseases. For vaccination to play an important role in managing chronic lung disease efforts need to be directed at understanding how various pathogens cause exacerbations and alter long-term lung function.",
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    Vaccines for children and adults with chronic lung disease : Efficacy against acute exacerbations. / O'Grady, Kerry-Ann; Chang, Anne; Grimwood, Keith.

    In: Expert Review of Respiratory Medicine, Vol. 8, No. 1, 2014, p. 43-55.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    AU - Chang, Anne

    AU - Grimwood, Keith

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