Validity of self-reported influenza and pneumococcal vaccination status among a cohort of hospitalized elderly inpatients

Susan Anne Skull, Ross Andrews, G BYRNES, H KELLY, Terry Nolan, Graham Brown, David Campbell

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Use of self-reported vaccination status is commonplace in assessing vaccination coverage for public health programs and individuals, yet limited validity data exist. We compared self-report with provider records for pneumococcal (23vPPV) and influenza vaccine for 4887 subjects aged ?65 years from two Australian hospitals. Self-reported influenza vaccination status had high sensitivity (98%), positive predictive value (PPV) (88%) and negative predictive value (NPV) (91%), but low specificity (56%). Self-reported 23vPPV (previous 5 years) had a sensitivity of 84%, specificity 77%, PPV 85% and NPV 76%. Clinicians can be reasonably confident of self-reported influenza vaccine status, and for positive self-report for 23vPPV in this setting. For program evaluation, self-reported influenza vaccination coverage among inpatients overestimates true coverage by about 10% versus 1% for 23vPPV. Self-report remains imperfect and whole-of-life immunisation registers a preferable goal. � 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)4775-4783
    Number of pages9
    JournalVaccine
    Volume25
    Issue number25
    Publication statusPublished - 2007

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    influenza
    Human Influenza
    Inpatients
    Vaccination
    vaccination
    Self Report
    Influenza Vaccines
    vaccines
    program evaluation
    Pneumococcal Vaccines
    Program Evaluation
    Immunization
    public health
    immunization
    Public Health
    Sensitivity and Specificity

    Cite this

    Skull, S. A., Andrews, R., BYRNES, G., KELLY, H., Nolan, T., Brown, G., & Campbell, D. (2007). Validity of self-reported influenza and pneumococcal vaccination status among a cohort of hospitalized elderly inpatients. Vaccine, 25(25), 4775-4783.
    Skull, Susan Anne ; Andrews, Ross ; BYRNES, G ; KELLY, H ; Nolan, Terry ; Brown, Graham ; Campbell, David. / Validity of self-reported influenza and pneumococcal vaccination status among a cohort of hospitalized elderly inpatients. In: Vaccine. 2007 ; Vol. 25, No. 25. pp. 4775-4783.
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    Skull, SA, Andrews, R, BYRNES, G, KELLY, H, Nolan, T, Brown, G & Campbell, D 2007, 'Validity of self-reported influenza and pneumococcal vaccination status among a cohort of hospitalized elderly inpatients', Vaccine, vol. 25, no. 25, pp. 4775-4783.

    Validity of self-reported influenza and pneumococcal vaccination status among a cohort of hospitalized elderly inpatients. / Skull, Susan Anne; Andrews, Ross; BYRNES, G; KELLY, H; Nolan, Terry; Brown, Graham; Campbell, David.

    In: Vaccine, Vol. 25, No. 25, 2007, p. 4775-4783.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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