Water quantitatively induces the mucoadhesion of liquid crystalline phases of glyceryl monooleate

Jaehwi Lee, Simon A. Young, Ian W. Kellaway

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The possible role of water in the mucoadhesion phenomenon exhibited by the liquid crystalline phases of glyceryl monooleate was investigated using an in-vitro tensile strength technique. The mucoadhesion of the liquid crystalline phases of glyceryl monooleate was found to occur following uptake of water. The mucoadhesive force of the cubic phase was consistent since it is not capable of taking up additional water. An increase in pre-load period greatly facilitated the mucoadhesion of glyceryl monooleate (0% w/w initial water content), suggesting that the mucoadhesion is dependent upon the extent of the dehydration of the substrate. A good linear relationship between initial water content of the liquid crystalline phases and mucoadhesive force led to the conclusion that the mucoadhesive force increased with decreasing initial water concentration. Rheological properties of the liquid crystalline phases were also studied to allow a correlation between physical changes and mucoadhesion of the liquid crystalline phases, revealing that higher water concentrations in the liquid crystalline phases led to a more ordered structure that showed less mucoadhesion. The results of this study indicated that the mucoadhesive force of the liquid crystalline phases of glyceryl monooleate is determined by the capability to take up water from a water-rich environment. It may, therefore, be advantageous to use the lamellar phase as a buccal drug carrier as opposed to the relatively less mucoadhesive cubic phase.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)629-636
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology
Volume53
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2001
Externally publishedYes

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