What do infectious diseases physicians do? A 2-week snapshot of inpatient consultative activities across Australia, New Zealand and Singapore

P Ingram, Allen Cheng, Ronan Murray, C Blyth, Tony Walls, D Fisher, Joshua Davis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    The practice of an infectious diseases (ID) physician is evolving. A contemporary understanding of the frequency and variety of patients and syndromes seen by ID services has implications for training, service development and setting research priorities. We performed a 2-week prospective survey of formal ID physician activities related to direct inpatient care, encompassing 53 hospitals throughout Australia, New Zealand and Singapore, and documented 1722 inpatient interactions. Infections involving the skin and soft tissue, respiratory tract and bone/joints together accounted for 49% of all consultations. Suspected/confirmed pathogens were primarily bacterial (60%), rather than viral (6%), fungal (4%), mycobacterial (2%) or parasitic (1%). Staphylococcus aureus was implicated in 409 (24%) episodes, approximately four times more frequently than the next most common pathogen. The frequency of healthcare-related infections (35%), immunosuppression (21%), diabetes mellitus (19%), prosthesis-related infections (13%), multiresistant pathogens (13%) and non-infectious diagnoses (9%) was high, although consultation characteristics varied between geographical settings and hospital types. Our study highlights the diversity of inpatient-related ID activities and should direct future teaching and research. ID physicians' ability to offer beneficial consultative advice requires broad understanding of, and ability to interact with, a wide range of referring specialities.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)737-744
    Number of pages8
    JournalClinical Microbiology and Infection
    Volume20
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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    Singapore
    New Zealand
    Communicable Diseases
    Inpatients
    Physicians
    Prosthesis-Related Infections
    Referral and Consultation
    Infection
    Research
    Respiratory System
    Immunosuppression
    Staphylococcus aureus
    Diabetes Mellitus
    Teaching
    Joints
    Delivery of Health Care
    Bone and Bones
    Skin

    Cite this

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    abstract = "The practice of an infectious diseases (ID) physician is evolving. A contemporary understanding of the frequency and variety of patients and syndromes seen by ID services has implications for training, service development and setting research priorities. We performed a 2-week prospective survey of formal ID physician activities related to direct inpatient care, encompassing 53 hospitals throughout Australia, New Zealand and Singapore, and documented 1722 inpatient interactions. Infections involving the skin and soft tissue, respiratory tract and bone/joints together accounted for 49{\%} of all consultations. Suspected/confirmed pathogens were primarily bacterial (60{\%}), rather than viral (6{\%}), fungal (4{\%}), mycobacterial (2{\%}) or parasitic (1{\%}). Staphylococcus aureus was implicated in 409 (24{\%}) episodes, approximately four times more frequently than the next most common pathogen. The frequency of healthcare-related infections (35{\%}), immunosuppression (21{\%}), diabetes mellitus (19{\%}), prosthesis-related infections (13{\%}), multiresistant pathogens (13{\%}) and non-infectious diagnoses (9{\%}) was high, although consultation characteristics varied between geographical settings and hospital types. Our study highlights the diversity of inpatient-related ID activities and should direct future teaching and research. ID physicians' ability to offer beneficial consultative advice requires broad understanding of, and ability to interact with, a wide range of referring specialities.",
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    What do infectious diseases physicians do? A 2-week snapshot of inpatient consultative activities across Australia, New Zealand and Singapore. / Ingram, P; Cheng, Allen; Murray, Ronan; Blyth, C; Walls, Tony; Fisher, D; Davis, Joshua.

    In: Clinical Microbiology and Infection, Vol. 20, No. 10, 2014, p. 737-744.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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