Who’s caring for whom? Disabled Indigenous carers experiences of Australia’s infrastructures of social protection

Michelle S. Fitts, Karen Soldatic

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Almost a quarter (23.9%) of Indigenous Australians report living with a disability. While most of them are cared for at home by female family members, there is limited understanding and insight into their lives. There is even less known about Indigenous primary carers who often also live with a disability and/or serious health condition requiring ongoing medical healthcare and support. This paper explicitly explores Indigenous disabled carer experiences who are navigating complex infrastructures of social protection for those that they care for and to gain support for their own health and disability needs as a disabled carer. The paper illustrates the significant disadvantages they experience given their regional locations of residency and the historicity of disability-carer support availability. Drawing upon their narratives from semi-structured interviews and yarning circles, three significant themes emerge: (i) Extended carer responsibilities for the family, (ii) Challenges applying for and receiving financial support as carers to support their own wellbeing as a disabled person and the disabled family member they cared for, (iii) Living in unsuitable accommodation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)477-492
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Family Studies
Volume28
Issue number2
Early online dateMar 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Who’s caring for whom? Disabled Indigenous carers experiences of Australia’s infrastructures of social protection'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this