Why Aboriginal women want to avoid the biomedical system: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's stories

Donna Hartz, Melanie Briggs, Sue Anne Cutmore, Dea Delaney-Thiele, Cherisse Buzzacott

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

In this chapter, four Aboriginal women tell stories about their births, their choices and the racism and abuse they received. They discuss the importance of culturally sensitive care and how this keeps women both culturally and physically safe. Some made choices (such as to homebirth) to protect themselves and their babies, and to ensure they received the care they needed. Some were failed badly by the system and tell a story of trauma and pain. Others are driving forces behind setting up services to help Aboriginal women reclaim their cultural rights in maternity care. Birthing on Country is one way this is happening in Australia. In some ways, birthing in the biomedical model for Aboriginal women is, as Dea states above, birthing outside the system. Birthing on Country is a way to place birth within the Aboriginal system again, combining cultural safety as a central principle with the added support of the medical care when needed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBirthing Outside the System
Subtitle of host publicationThe Canary in the Coal Mine
EditorsHannah Dahlen, Bashi Kumar-Hazard, Virginia Schmied
PublisherTaylor & Francis
Chapter16
Pages344-359
Number of pages16
Edition1st
ISBN (Electronic)9780429489853
ISBN (Print)9781138592704
Publication statusPublished - 5 Feb 2020

Publication series

NameRoutledge Research in Nursing and Midwifery

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