Why life history information matters

Drought refuges and macroinvertebrate persistence in non-perennial streams subject to a drier climate

Belinda J Robson, E T Chester, Chris Austin

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearch

    Abstract

    In some arid, semi-arid or Mediterranean climate regions, increased water extraction combined with climate change will prolong periods of drought in non-perennial streams, but the effects on macroinvertebrate populations are poorly understood. Drought refuges allow species to survive drying but their use depends on species' traits, and refuge availability depends on landscape structure. This review evaluates the utility of existing ecological concepts for predicting the role of drought refuges for sustaining biodiversity in non-perennial streams. We also suggest traits that may determine invertebrate species' resistance or resilience to prolonged drying. Parts of the likely responses by populations to increased stream drying are described by existing ecological concepts, such as the biological traits of species and their interaction with the habitat templet, barriers to dispersal and metapopulation dynamics, the use of drought refuges, habitat fragmentation and population and landscape genetics. However, the limited knowledge of invertebrate life histories in non-perennial streams restricts our ability to use these concepts in a predictive manner. In particular, reach or pool occupancy by species cannot be accurately predicted, but such predictions are necessary for evaluating potential management actions such as the use of environmental flows to sustain drought refuges during dry periods. � CSIRO 2011.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)801-810
    Number of pages10
    JournalMarine and Freshwater Research
    Volume62
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 25 Jul 2011

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    Droughts
    Climate
    macroinvertebrates
    refuge
    macroinvertebrate
    life history
    persistence
    drought
    climate
    drying
    Invertebrates
    Ecosystem
    invertebrate
    invertebrates
    Mediterranean Region
    Aptitude
    Climate Change
    Biodiversity
    landscape structure
    Population Genetics

    Cite this

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    title = "Why life history information matters: Drought refuges and macroinvertebrate persistence in non-perennial streams subject to a drier climate",
    abstract = "In some arid, semi-arid or Mediterranean climate regions, increased water extraction combined with climate change will prolong periods of drought in non-perennial streams, but the effects on macroinvertebrate populations are poorly understood. Drought refuges allow species to survive drying but their use depends on species' traits, and refuge availability depends on landscape structure. This review evaluates the utility of existing ecological concepts for predicting the role of drought refuges for sustaining biodiversity in non-perennial streams. We also suggest traits that may determine invertebrate species' resistance or resilience to prolonged drying. Parts of the likely responses by populations to increased stream drying are described by existing ecological concepts, such as the biological traits of species and their interaction with the habitat templet, barriers to dispersal and metapopulation dynamics, the use of drought refuges, habitat fragmentation and population and landscape genetics. However, the limited knowledge of invertebrate life histories in non-perennial streams restricts our ability to use these concepts in a predictive manner. In particular, reach or pool occupancy by species cannot be accurately predicted, but such predictions are necessary for evaluating potential management actions such as the use of environmental flows to sustain drought refuges during dry periods. � CSIRO 2011.",
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    Why life history information matters : Drought refuges and macroinvertebrate persistence in non-perennial streams subject to a drier climate. / Robson, Belinda J; Chester, E T; Austin, Chris.

    In: Marine and Freshwater Research, Vol. 62, No. 7, 25.07.2011, p. 801-810.

    Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debateResearch

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    T2 - Drought refuges and macroinvertebrate persistence in non-perennial streams subject to a drier climate

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    AU - Chester, E T

    AU - Austin, Chris

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    KW - population dynamics

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