Why Visual Ethnography Should Be Used to Incorporate Traditional Knowledge Into Health Promotion in Remote Aboriginal Communities

Adam Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

Health promotion within Aboriginal communities has typically come from a top-down approach with government-funded health research directing the nature in which health information is disseminated. Previous literature has argued for two-way interaction that requires an equivalent bottom-up approach to integrate community beliefs and perceptions. Good hygiene has been the focus of many health promotion campaigns to reduce the presence of a wide variety of pathogens, but to date, there have been few attempts to incorporate traditional knowledge into such campaigns. This article proposes that visual ethnography, specifically community video, provides a good method for understanding community beliefs while simultaneously creating health promotion materials within the local culture.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-7
Number of pages7
JournalSage Open
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2019

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health promotion
ethnography
community
campaign
hygiene
health information
video
Health Promotion
Ethnography
Traditional Knowledge
interaction
health

Cite this

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Why Visual Ethnography Should Be Used to Incorporate Traditional Knowledge Into Health Promotion in Remote Aboriginal Communities. / Thompson, Adam.

In: Sage Open, Vol. 9, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. 1-7.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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