Word-frequency effects on short-term memory tasks: Evidence for a redintegration process in immediate serial recall

Charles Hulme, Steven Roodenrys, Gordon D.A. Brown, Richard Schweickert, Sarah Martin, George Stuart

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Four experiments investigated the mechanisms responsible for the advantage enjoyed by high-frequency words in short-term memory tasks. Experiment 1 demonstrated effects of word frequency on memory span that were independent of differences in speech rate. Experiments 2 and 3 showed that word frequency has an increasing effect on serial recall across serial positions, but Experiment 4 showed that this effect was abolished for backward recall. A model that includes a redintegration process that operates to "clean up" decayed short-term memory traces is proposed, and the multinomial processing tree model described by R. Schweickert (1993) is used to provide a quantitative fit to data from Experiments 2, 3, and 4.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1217-1232
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning Memory and Cognition
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 1997
Externally publishedYes

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