Writing as Kin: Producing Ethical Histories Through Collaboration in Unexpected Places. Researching F.W. Albrecht, Assimilation Policy and Lutheran Experiments in Aboriginal Education

Katherine Ellinghaus, Barry Judd

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

    Abstract

    This chapter explores the possibilities of relationality through collaboration between an Indigenous and non-Indigenous scholar. It describes an attempt to move beyond the problematic ways in which Indigenous history has largely been written by non-Indigenous historians who utilise archival sources without engaging with the Indigenous communities or people about whom they write. We describe the methodology of a project that focuses on the work of the Finke River Mission and its head missionary Friedrich Wilhelm Albrecht who, during the 1950 and 1960s, initiated an education scheme that targeted ‘half-caste’ Indigenous girls living on pastoral stations across Central Australia.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationQuestioning Indigenous-Settler Relations
    Subtitle of host publicationInterdisciplinary Perspectives
    EditorsSarah Maddison , Sana Nakata
    PublisherSpringer Singapore
    Chapter4
    Pages55-68
    Number of pages14
    ISBN (Electronic)9789811392054
    ISBN (Print)9789811392047
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2019

    Publication series

    NameIndigenous-Settler Relations in Australia and the World
    PublisherSpringer
    Volume1
    ISSN (Print)2524-5767

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