Place discourses in the context of high levels of population migration

: a case study of Mindil Beach in the Northern Territory of Australia

  • Jamie Andrew Seaton

    Student thesis: Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) - CDU

    Abstract

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how place discourses emerge in places characterised by high levels of population migration, and to stimulate future research concerned with these phenomena. Within human geography literature (see Riddett 1995; Sheller 2004; Roberts and Young 2008) there is a growing assumption that population migration influences the way places are produced and maintained. Commenting on these phenomena in the Northern Territory of Australia for example, Roberts and Young (2008, p.53) suggested that high levels of population migration “inevitably impacts upon Darwin‟s sense of place”. If such an assumption is true, there will be implications for the management of places that are characterised by high levels of migration.

    My research explored this growing assumption that population migration influences the way places are produced and maintained. To conduct my exploration I first developed a case study (i.e. Mindil Beach in Darwin, Australia) and a theoretical framework influenced by social constructionism and symbolic interactionism. Next, I produced two data sets - NT migration phases and Mindil Beach discourses (using a descriptive analysis and Ethnographic Content Analysis [ECA] methodology respectively) – which formed the basis of my investigation. Through a comparative analysis of these data sets, I explored the possibility that the NT‟s migration patterns influenced the emergence of Mindil Beach discourses.

    My comparative analysis of NT migration phases and Mindil Beach discourses yielded valuable theoretical, methodological and practical results. In respect to theory, my results conveyed alternative theoretical perspectives regarding the influence of population migration on the production of place. Through an in-depth discussion of these perspectives I established a new agenda for future research. In respect to methodology, my results exhibited an unconventional execution of Ethnographic Content Analysis and therefore broadened the means by which place research can be undertaken. In respect to practice, my research proposed useful techniques to manage places characterised by extreme population migration.

    Note: How to deposit your thesis see: http://www.cdu.edu.au/library/how/deposit.html
    Date of Award2011
    LanguageEnglish
    SupervisorMartin Young (Supervisor), Jennifer Wolgemuth (Supervisor) & Dean Carson (Supervisor)

    Cite this

    Place discourses in the context of high levels of population migration: a case study of Mindil Beach in the Northern Territory of Australia
    Seaton, J. A. (Author). 2011

    Student thesis: Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) - CDU